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9 Money Tips for High School Graduates

Money Tips for High School Graduates by PWD

With these 9 money tips, we show you the ability to handle money is undoubtedly one of the most crucial practical life skills to master, yet it is not taught in schools.

When we start university or acquire a job, we’re generally expected to figure it out for ourselves, and many individuals discover the significance of proper money management the hard way.

With today’s students graduating from university with more debt than ever before and entering the job market in an economy still reeling from the consequences of a recession, you’ll need financial savvy more than any prior generation.

In this post, we’ll teach you some topics about money and personal finance that you may not have understood before, as well as how you may improve your financial intelligence while still in school.

Money Management and Finance Tips by PWD Media 2

Understanding Financial Basics

What no one tells you about money

Leaving home to attend university, as well as leaving university to enter the real world, can be scary.

To some degree, the university prepares you for the real world: after all, you’ll manage your own money and living expenses for the first time and budget to ensure that your money goes as far as possible.

However, after three or more years of relative independence and studying a topic you adore, the world of a full-time job may still be unsettling. Once you start a job, the financial aid you receive from your parents will decrease, and the days of enjoying all those student discounts and scholarships are over. Instead, you’re forced to make a livelihood by working fixed hours five or more days a week, performing a job you don’t particularly love, and possibly sharing a property because rents in your region are too high.

It may take some getting used to after all the fun you had at university, but it will be extremely beneficial if you have the necessary financial expertise. Here are some things they don’t tell you about money to get you started.

Creating Your Post-Graduation Budge

Making a post-graduation budget is a critical step towards financial freedom. Begin by evaluating your revenue sources, which should include your employment compensation, freelancing gigs, and any side hustles. Determine your monthly take-home earnings to get a clear starting point.

Next, divide your necessary costs (rent, utilities, groceries, transportation, and student loan payments) so they do not exceed 50% of your income. Set aside 20% of your income for savings and debt reduction. Setting this amount away provides a safety net and supports your future financial objectives.

The remaining 30% is set aside for discretionary expenditure, which includes entertainment, dining out, and non-essential goods. Accept budgeting programmes or applications that track and categorise your expenditure, assisting you in monitoring and changing your budget. Consider setting up an emergency fund to deal with unexpected expenses or career changes.

As your circumstances change, examine and alter your budget to ensure it matches with your financial goals and adapts to new possibilities or obligations. After graduation, establishing this financial path provides the basis for solid money management and long-term stability.

Creating Healthy Saving Habits

Developing appropriate saving habits at a young age is critical for financial stability and security. Individuals who save early can use the power of compounding interest, allowing their money to expand tremendously over time. Individuals who begin early might reap long-term rewards and have more time to achieve their financial objectives. It also fosters an attitude of financial responsibility and readiness, which can greatly influence one’s future financial well-being.

Setting attainable savings goals is essential for remaining motivated and dedicated. Begin by setting clear and attainable goals, whether they are for emergencies, a specific purchase, retirement, or investment. To properly measure progress, divide these goals into smaller, attainable milestones.

A budget that details income, spending, and savings may offer a clear picture of where money is going and how much can be saved. Savings may be automated by establishing automatic transfers or direct payments into a designated savings account, ensuring consistency and reducing the temptation to spend before saving.

Making saving a habit requires consistency. Implement tactics such as paying yourself first, in which a portion of your salary is allocated to savings before any costs. Reduce wasteful spending or identify ways to raise income to maximise your savings potential. Saving objectives should be reviewed and adjusted regularly as circumstances change to ensure they stay reachable and relevant.

Finally, learning about various saving and investing choices will assist in maximising money’s growth potential while minimising dangers. These practices, with attention and perseverance, can establish a solid basis for a financially secure future.

Navigating Student Loans and Debts

Navigating the maze of student loans after graduation can be difficult, but there are techniques to help you manage and properly pay down your debt. First, make a detailed list of your debts, including their terms, interest rates, and repayment schedules. This clarity will enable you to create a repayment strategy specific to your financial position. Investigate alternative repayment choices, including income-driven programmes or refinancing, to cut interest rates potentially.

Practise prudent financial practises to prevent being overly indebted. Budgeting is essential—keep meticulous track of your costs, prioritise needs, and set aside a percentage of your income for loan repayments. It’s also a good idea to pay more than the minimum amount whenever feasible, even if it’s just a few dollars more each month; this strategy may dramatically minimise the total interest accumulated over time.

Avoid buying now and paying later schemes such as “AfterPay,” “Apple Pay Later,” “Affirm”, and many more. Interest rates can vary by up to 36%. The Cons of the scheme is a risk of Overspending.

One of the biggest dangers of using BNPL services is that it can be easy to overextend your finances. Only looking at the cost of each payment may make it difficult to register the full cost of the item. Especially when you make several purchases with buy now, pay later arrangements, bills can rack up—and be challenging to juggle.

Finally, avoid further debt by being aware of credit card spending and living within your means. You can negotiate student loans and debts while developing a sound financial foundation for the future by taking proactive actions and remaining educated.

Investment Insights for Beginners

Investing might be intimidating initially, but understanding a few essential ideas can make all the difference. The power of compounding is one of the most critical concepts for novices to grasp. Investment returns create further returns over time, like a snowball effect for your money. The earlier you begin investing, the more time your money has to multiply.

Low-risk choices might be a fantastic place to start for young graduates interested in investing. Consider a high-yield savings account or certificates of deposit (CDs), which provide moderate yields while protecting your money.

Another choice is investing in diversified exchange-traded funds (ETFs) or index funds, which spread your investment over several assets and reduce risk compared to investing in individual equities. This diversity can help newcomers weather market changes and is typically better favourable for long-term growth.

Remember that patience is essential. Investing is a journey, not a sprint. Starting small, knowing the fundamentals, and remaining persistent in your investment efforts may provide huge long-term returns.

Second Jobs and Part-Time Jobs

Second jobs and part-time employment are excellent ways to supplement your income while remaining flexible. These changes complement your primary income, help you save for a rainy day, or even act as a stepping stone to business. One significant advantage is the possibility to diversify your revenue streams, which reduces your reliance on a single source of money. Side jobs allow you to pursue interests or abilities that may not be used entirely in your primary career, boosting personal and professional development.

Consider using online platforms such as freelancing websites to locate flexible employment opportunities where you may offer talents such as graphic design, writing, coding, or virtual support. Flexible schedules are available with delivery and ridesharing services, allowing you to work as much or as little as you need.

Investigate the freelancing market as well – tasks like pet sitting, home sitting, or tutoring may be scheduled around your present obligations. Networking within your neighbourhood or online organisations may lead to local part-time jobs or freelance employment that fit your skills well.

Remember to match secondary jobs or part-time employment to your talents, hobbies, and schedule. Balancing these pursuits with your major responsibilities is critical for long-term sustainability and fulfilment.

Credit Cards: Best Practices

When used appropriately, credit cards may be effective financial instruments. Making regular payments and keeping balances low compared to the credit limit are critical for building a healthy credit history. To prevent interest costs (18-22%), try to pay off the entire sum each month. Begin with a low credit limit and progressively increase your request as your credit history improves. Paying your payments on time consistently demonstrates responsible financial conduct and improves your credit score.

It would be best to be disciplined and conscious of your spending patterns to avoid debt. Make a budget that includes both required and discretionary expenditures. Limit your credit card use to the amount you can easily pay off each month. It’s a good idea to maintain track of transactions, examine statements on a regular basis, and ensure they’re in line with your budget. Credit cards should be used for convenience and emergencies, not to bridge financial gaps or to make wasteful purchases.

Finally, learn the characteristics of credit cards to get the most out of them. Look for cards with rewards or payback programmes corresponding to your purchasing patterns. Take advantage of introductory discounts or special prices, but watch for hidden fees and conditions. By utilising credit cards wisely, you may take advantage of their benefits while avoiding the hazards of debt buildup.

Some avoid using credit cards to improve their credit rating. Minor bank loans or minor products like a refrigerator on payment are money savers that will also obtain you a credit rating.

In the end, a good credit rating is essential if you want to buy a house or a larger item in the future. It is all about establishing trust.

Planning for Emergencies

An emergency fund is your financial safety net, a vital buffer for unanticipated events. The question is not if an unexpected expense will occur but when. A substantial emergency fund protects you from financial hardship during these trying times. Establish a specific target for your emergency fund – often, three to six months’ worth of living costs.

Examine your monthly expenses, such as rent or mortgage, utilities, groceries, and other necessities. Create a regular savings strategy, putting aside a percentage of your monthly salary until you attain your goal. Consider automating transactions to maintain consistent contributions to your emergency fund.

Keeping your emergency fund in good shape takes discipline and attention. Avoid the temptation to use it for things that aren’t emergencies. As your financial condition changes, assess and alter your savings target regularly. To avoid impulse spending, keep the money accessible but separate from your normal spending accounts.

Review your costs regularly and make any necessary changes to your savings strategy. Remember that an emergency fund isn’t simply for unforeseen bills; it’s also for peace of mind and being prepared for life’s unpredictability.

Seeking Professional Financial Advice

Graduation is a landmark moment in one’s life when financial decisions may significantly affect one’s future. Seeking competent financial guidance is an excellent first step towards a solid financial foundation.

Graduates can get references from reliable sources like family, friends, or professional networks while looking for reputable financial advisors. Verifying the advisor’s credentials, experience, and licences confirms their validity and skill in directing financial concerns.

Professional financial counsel has various advantages, particularly in the early phases of one’s career. Advisors can help you set realistic financial objectives, develop personalised budgets, manage student loan repayments, and plan long-term investments.

Their advice goes beyond statistics, encouraging financial awareness and discipline, which are lifelong benefits. In the end, getting expert financial counsel enables graduates to manage difficulties, make educated decisions, and establish a solid financial future.

An extra money tip

Here is a little yet important piece of advice that will aid you from the start:

Opening a separate bank account for your business pursuits is a wise decision that explains your finances. Separating personal and corporate costs simplifies recordkeeping.

Request that the bank provide you with a Debit Card for your named Business or Venture bank account; this way, you may use one for personal and one for business purposes – simple.

A separate business account simplifies cost management, making it simple to distinguish between personal and professional spending. This division greatly decreases the amount of time and effort necessary for tax return preparation, as well as the necessity for expensive tax accountants.

You receive a clearer view of your financial health and may correctly record business-related charges, maximising tax savings and maintaining compliance with clearly demarcated company expenditures.

Maintaining separate accounts helps with tax issues and promotes better financial management. It provides a clearer picture of business viability and aids in making educated decisions. Furthermore, it demonstrates professionalism to clients and partners, bolstering credibility and dependability.

Keeping personal and corporate funds separate provides a solid foundation for your company’s financial health and growth, allowing you to focus on strategic business goals without being distracted by interwoven expenditures.

If you enjoyed reading this article, you may want to check out these related articles that can help enhance your understanding of the topic even further.

Latest Update on November 21, 2023

Disclosure: If you opt to purchase a premium plan, we may get affiliate income for some of the links in this article at NO additional cost to you. Our affiliate disclosure may be found in our privacy policy. This website is not intended to offer financial advice. This is only for amusement purposes.

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